1937 German Third Reich Erich Ludendorff - The First Quartermaster General Commander of the German Army - Commemorating His Passing 1865 - 1937. Crown Bronze Medal with Rich Toning, 36 mm.
1937 German Third Reich Erich Ludendorff - The First Quartermaster General Commander of the German Army - Commemorating His Passing 1865 - 1937. Crown Bronze Medal with Rich Toning, 36 mm.

1937 German Third Reich Erich Ludendorff - The First Quartermaster General Commander of the German Army - Commemorating His Passing 1865 - 1937. Crown Bronze Medal with Rich Toning, 36 mm.

$300.00

1937 German Third Reich Erich Ludendorff - The First Quartermaster General Commander of the German Army - Commemorating His Passing 1865 - 1937. Crown Bronze Medal with Rich Toning, Great Condition! 36 mm 18.6 Grs. V.Rare. 


Country.       The German Empire, 3rd Reich.
Subject.       Erich Ludendoff, First Quartermaster General
                     Commander of the German Army
                     Commemorative Medal of His Passing 1865 - 1937
Date.            1937
Composition. Bronze.
Size.               36 mm
Weight.          18.6 Grs.

Very rare and special medal marking the death of Germany's Commander in Chief of the German Army - Erich Ludendorff.

- Erich Ludendorff: -
Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff (9 April 1865 – 20 December 1937) was a German general, politician and military theorist. He first achieved fame during World War I for his central role in the German Army’s victories at Liège and Tannenberg in 1914. Upon his rise to First Quartermaster-general of the Great General Staff on August 1916, he emerged as the leading policymaker in a military dictatorship that dominated Germany for the remainder of the war. Ultimately, he fell from power in October 1918 after the failure of Germany's Spring Offensive and the Allies' crushing breakthrough at the Hindenburg Line.

After the war, Ludendorff became a prominent nationalist leader, and a promoter of the Stab-in-the-back myth, which posited that the German loss in World War I was caused by the betrayal of the German Army by Marxists, Bolsheviks, Freemasons and Jews who were furthermore responsible for the disadvantageous settlement negotiated for Germany in the Treaty of Versailles. He took part in the failed Kapp Putsch (coup d’état) with Wolfgang Kapp in 1920 and the Beer Hall Putsch of Adolf Hitler in 1923, and in 1925, he unsuccessfully ran for the office of President of Germany against his former superior Hindenburg.

From 1924 to 1928, he represented the German Völkisch Freedom Party in the Reichstag (legislature). Consistently pursuing a purely military line of thought after the war, Ludendorff developed the theory of "Total War", which he published as Der totale Krieg (The Total War) in 1935. In this work, he argued that the entire physical and moral forces of the nation should be mobilized, because peace was merely an interval between wars. Ludendorff was a recipient of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross and the Pour le Mérite.

Ludendorff divorced and married his second wife Mathilde von Kemnitz (1877–1966) in 1926. They published books and essays to prove that the world's problems were the result of Christianity, especially the Jesuits and Catholics, but also conspiracies by Jews and the Freemasons. They founded the Bund für Gotteserkenntnis (in German) (Society for the Knowledge of God), a small and rather obscure esoterical society of Theists that survives to this day. He launched several abusive attacks on his former superior Hindenburg for not having acted in a "nationalistic soldier-like fashion".

By the time Hitler came to power, Ludendorff was no longer sympathetic to him. The Nazis distanced themselves from Ludendorff because of his eccentric conspiracy theories.

On 30 January 1933, the occasion of Hitler's appointment as Chancellor by President Hindenburg, Ludendorff sent the following telegram to Hindenburg:

"I solemnly prophesy that this accursed man will cast our Reich into the abyss and bring our nation to inconceivable misery. Future generations will damn you in your grave for what you have done."

In an attempt to regain Ludendorff's favor, Hitler arrived unannounced at Ludendorff's home on his 70th birthday in 1935 to promote him to field marshal. Infuriated, Ludendorff allegedly rebuffed Hitler by telling him: "An officer is named General Field-Marshal on the battlefield! Not at a birthday tea-party in the midst of peace." He wrote two further books on military themes, demonstrating that he still could think coherently about war despite his political and social prejudices.

Ludendorff died of liver cancer in the private clinic Josephinum in Munich, on 20 December 1937 at the age of 72. He was given—against his explicit wishes—a state funeral organized and attended by Hitler, who declined to speak at his eulogy. He was buried in the Neuer Friedhof in Tutzing in Bavaria.

                              
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