1913 German Empire Kingdom of Bavaria - King Otto I 5-Marks Beautiful Large Silver Coin, Attractive Great Condition V.Scarce.
1913 German Empire Kingdom of Bavaria - King Otto I 5-Marks Beautiful Large Silver Coin, Attractive Great Condition V.Scarce.

1913 German Empire Kingdom of Bavaria - King Otto I 5-Marks Beautiful Large Silver Coin, Attractive Great Condition V.Scarce.

$190.00
1913 German Empire Kingdom of Bavaria - King Otto I 5-Marks Beautiful Large Silver Coin, Attractive Great Condition V.Scarce.

Country.    Kingdom of Bavaria (German Empire)
Ruler.         Otto I.
Years.        1902
Value.        5-Marks
Composition. Silver
Weight.           27.7 g
Diameter.        38.0 mm

- King Otto I, Kingdom of Bavaria: -
Otto (27 April 1848 – 11 October 1916) was King of Bavaria from 1886 until his death. However, he never actively ruled because of alleged severe mental illness. His uncle, Luitpold, and his cousin, Ludwig, served as regents.

Ludwig deposed him in 1913, a day after the legislature passed a law allowing him to do so, and became king in his own right.

Otto was the son of Maximilian II and his wife, Marie of Prussia, and the younger brother of Ludwig II.

When King Ludwig II was incapacitated by his ministers on 10 June 1886, his uncle Luitpold took over the reign of the Kingdom of Bavaria and led the affairs of state in Ludwig's place as Prince Regent; his official title in this function was "Administrator of the Kingdom of Bavaria". Only three days later Ludwig II died under unknown circumstances, and Prince Otto succeeded him as King of Bavaria on 13 June 1886 in accordance with the Wittelsbach succession law.

Since Otto was unable to lead the government due to his mental illness (officially it was said: "The King is melancholic"), Prince Regent Luitpold also ruled for him. He did not understand his proclamation of his accession to the throne, which was proclaimed to King Otto at Fürstenried Palace the next day after his accession. He thought his uncle Luitpold was the rightful king. Shortly thereafter, the Bavarian troops were sworn in on King Otto I and coins were minted with his portrait.

Luitpold kept his role as Prince Regent until he died in 1912 and was succeeded by his son Ludwig, who was Otto's first cousin. By then, it had been obvious for some time that Otto would never emerge from seclusion or be mentally capable of actively reigning. Almost as soon as Ludwig became regent, elements in the press and larger society clamoured for Ludwig to become king in his own right.

Accordingly, the constitution of Bavaria was amended on 4 November 1913 to include a clause specifying that if a regency for reasons of incapacity lasted for ten years, with no expectation that the King would ever be able to reign, the Regent could end the regency, depose the King and assume the crown himself with the assent of the legislature. The following day, Prince Regent Ludwig ended the regency and proclaimed his own reign as Ludwig III. The parliament assented on 6 November, and Ludwig III took the constitutional oath on 8 November. King Otto was permitted to retain his title and honours for life.

Otto died unexpectedly on 11 October 1916 from a volvulus (an obstruction of the bowel). His remains were interred in the crypt of the Michaelskirche in Munich. Bavarian tradition caused the heart of the king to be placed in a silver urn and sent to the Gnadenkapelle (Chapel of the Miraculous Image) in Altötting, beside those of his brother, father and grandfather.

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