{Sold} 1911 - 1915 China Great Qing Empire Yunnan Province Dragon 3-Mace 6-Candareens / Half-Dollar 50-Cents Silver Coin. Marked "Guang-xu Yuan-bao", 33.0 mm, 13.2 Grs.
{Sold} 1911 - 1915 China Great Qing Empire Yunnan Province Dragon 3-Mace 6-Candareens / Half-Dollar 50-Cents Silver Coin. Marked "Guang-xu Yuan-bao", 33.0 mm, 13.2 Grs.

{Sold} 1911 - 1915 China Great Qing Empire Yunnan Province Dragon 3-Mace 6-Candareens / Half-Dollar 50-Cents Silver Coin. Marked "Guang-xu Yuan-bao", 33.0 mm, 13.2 Grs.

$1.00
1911 - 1915 China Great Qing Empire Yunnan Province Dragon 3-Mace 6-Candareens / Half-Dollar 50-Cents Silver Coin. Marked "Guang-xu Yuan-bao", 33.0 mm, 13.2 Grs. Lovely Details, Great Condition!

Country.      The Great Qing Dynasty.
Year.            1911- 1915
Value.          3-Mace 6-Candareens / Half Dollar 50-Cents
Composition. Silver.800
Size.            33.0 mm
Weight.       13.2 Grs.

- The Guangxu Emperor, of the Great Qing Dynasty: -
The Guangxu Emperor (14 August 1871 – 14 November 1908), personal name Zaitian, was the 11th Emperor of the Qing dynasty, and the ninth Qing emperor to rule over China proper. His reign lasted from 1875 to 1908, but in practice he ruled, without Empress Dowager Cixi's influence, only from 1889 to 1898. He initiated the Hundred Days' Reform, but was abruptly stopped when the empress dowager launched a coup in 1898, after which he was put under house arrest until his death. His regnal name, "Guangxu", means "glorious succession".

The Guangxu Emperor's duties after 1898 became rather limited. Some[who?] have argued that the emperor was effectively removed from power as emperor (despite keeping the title), but he did retain some status.

The emperor was kept informed of state affairs, reading them with Cixi prior to audiences, and was also present at audiences, sitting on a stool to Cixi's left hand while Cixi occupied the main throne. He discharged his ceremonial duties, such as offering sacrifices during ceremonies, but never ruled alone again.

In 1898, shortly after the collapse of the Hundred Days' Reform, the Guangxu Emperor's health began to decline, prompting Cixi to name Pujun, a son of the emperor's cousin, the reactionary Prince Duan, as heir presumptive. Pujun and his father were removed from their positions after the Boxer Rebellion. He was examined by a physician at the French Legation and diagnosed with chronic nephritis; he was also discovered to be impotent at the time.

During the Boxer Rebellion, Emperor Guangxu fiercely opposed the idea of using usurpers as a means to counter foreign invasion. His letter to then United States president Theodore Roosevelt is still preserved in U.S. government archives. On 14 August 1900, the Guangxu Emperor, along with Cixi, Empress Longyu and some other court officials, fled from Beijing as the forces of the Eight-Nation Alliance marched on the capital to relieve the legations that had been besieged during the Boxer Rebellion.

Returning to the capital in January 1902, after the withdrawal of the foreign powers, the Guangxu Emperor spent the next few years working in his isolated palace with watches and clocks, which had been a childhood fascination, some say in an effort to pass the time until Cixi's death. He also read widely and spent time learning English from Cixi's Western-educated lady-in-waiting, Yu Deling. His relationship with Empress Longyu, Cixi's niece (and the Emperor's own first cousin), also improved to some extent.

The Guangxu Emperor died on 14 November 1908, a day before Cixi's death. He was only 37. For a long time there were several theories about the emperor's death, none of them completely accepted by historians. Most were inclined to believe that Cixi, herself very ill, poisoned the Guangxu Emperor because she was afraid he would reverse her policies after her death. Another theory is that the Guangxu Emperor was poisoned by Yuan Shikai, who knew that if the emperor were to come to power again, Yuan would likely be executed for treason. There were no reliable sources to prove who murdered the Guangxu Emperor. In 1911, Cixi's former eunuch Li Lianying was murdered, possibly by Yuan, implying that they had conspired in the emperor's murder. This theory was offered by Puyi in his biography; he claimed he heard it from an old eunuch.

The medical records kept by the Guangxu Emperor's physician show the emperor suffered from "spells of violent stomachache", and that his face turned blue, typical symptoms of arsenic poisoning. To dispel persistent rumours that the emperor had been poisoned, the Qing imperial court produced documents and doctors' records suggesting that the Guangxu Emperor died from natural causes, but these did not allay suspicion.

On 4 November 2008, forensic tests revealed that the level of arsenic in the Guangxu Emperor's remains was 2,000 times higher than that of ordinary people. Scientists concluded that the poison could only have been administered in a high dose one time. China Daily quoted a historian, Dai Yi, who speculated that Cixi might have known of her imminent death and worried that the Guangxu Emperor would continue his reforms after her death.

The Guangxu Emperor was succeeded by Cixi's choice as heir, his nephew Puyi, who took the regnal name "Xuantong". The Guangxu Emperor's consort, who became Empress Dowager Longyu, signed the abdication decree as regent in 1912, ending two thousand years of imperial rule in China. Longyu died childless in 1913.

After the Xinhai Revolution of 1911–1912, the Chinese Republic funded the construction of the Guangxu Emperor's mausoleum in the Western Qing Tombs. The tomb was robbed during the Chinese Civil War and the underground palace (burial chamber) is now open to the public.

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