1894 Old Suisse Confederacy Vaud Lausanne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Jean Daniel Abraham Davel”, 45 mm Mintage < 300.
1894 Old Suisse Confederacy Vaud Lausanne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Jean Daniel Abraham Davel”, 45 mm Mintage < 300.

1894 Old Suisse Confederacy Vaud Lausanne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Jean Daniel Abraham Davel”, 45 mm Mintage < 300.

$460.00

1894 Old Suisse Confederacy Vaud Lausanne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Jean Daniel Abraham Davel” Mint. < 300 (Book Ref.: Richter 1591-b) High Reliefs Great Condition Lovely Toned Large 45 mm. V. Rare!

Jean Daniel Abraham Davel, (Major Davel), (20 October 1670, Morrens - 24 April 1723, Vidy) was a soldier and patriot of Vaud.  Abraham Davel, after studying in Lausanne, became a notary and land commissioner. In 1692, he began his military career in the service of Prince Eugene of Savoy and John Churchill. He participated alongside the Bernese in the second Villmergen War of 1712, and after the victory of the Protestant alliance received a pension and settled in Vaud where he resumed judicial office. In 1717, he was appointed by the Bernese to command the Vaud militia of the district of Lavaux. 

In the face of Vaudois resistance to the introduction of the Helvetic Consensus, Davel felt himself to be called by God to liberate his country from the power of Berne. On 31 March 1723 he entered Lausanne in the company of 500 to 600 unarmed men at a moment when the Bernese bailiffs were absent. There, he assembled the municipal council, and presented them with a manifesto in which a number of failures and abuses were levelled at the government in Bern. And so he made public his plan aiming for the autonomy of the land of Vaud. But the council immediately reported the incident to Bern, and Davel was arrested on 1 April. He maintained, even under torture that his undertaking was suggested directly by God and that he had no accomplices. He was condemned by the court of citizens (Lausanne) to death and was beheaded on 24 April at Vidy. 

Today the Vaud section of the Swiss fraternity, Zofingia, commemorates the sacrifice of Major Davel every 24 April, in a procession following his route on that day in 1723, leaving from the Château Saint-Maire in Lausanne and leading up to the monument at Vidy, the site of his execution. A stele was erected in Louis Bourget Park at the place where the scaffolding was placed. It bears the following inscription: "Here Davel gave his life for his country, 24 April 1723". 

Later, inspired by the French Revolution of 1789–1799, the Vaudois drove out the Bernese governor in 1798 and declared the Lemanic Republic. Vaud nationalists like Frédéric-César de La Harpe had called for French intervention in liberating the area, and French Revolutionary troops moved in, taking over the whole of Switzerland itself in the process and setting up the Helvetic Republic. Under Napoleon I (Emperor 1804-1815), Vaud became (1798-1803) the canton of Léman.

Unrest about the abolition of feudal rights and taxes led to increased discontent, which culminated in the revolt of the Bourla-papey in spring 1802, closely followed by the Stecklikrieg (August to October, 1802) that brought the end of the entire Helvetic Republic in 1803. In 1803 Vaud joined the re-installed Swiss Confederation. In spite of Bernese attempts to reclaim Vaud, it has remained a sovereign canton ever since.

                              
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