{Sold} 1889 Old Suisse Confederacy Luzern Lucerne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Swiss Folk Hero - Wilhelm Tell”, 45 mm Mintage < 500.
{Sold} 1889 Old Suisse Confederacy Luzern Lucerne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Swiss Folk Hero - Wilhelm Tell”, 45 mm Mintage < 500.

{Sold} 1889 Old Suisse Confederacy Luzern Lucerne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Swiss Folk Hero - Wilhelm Tell”, 45 mm Mintage < 500.

$325.00
1889 Old Suisse Confederacy Luzern Lucerne Schutzenfest Shooting Silver Medal “Swiss Folk Hero - Wilhelm Tell” Mint. < 500 (Book Ref.: Richter 867a) High Reliefs Great Condition Lovely Toned Large 45 mm. V.Rare.

- Wilhelm Tell: -

William Tell is a folk hero of Switzerland. According to the legend, Tell was an expert marksman with the crossbow who assassinated Albrecht Gessler, a tyrannical reeve of the Austrian dukes of the House of Habsburg positioned in Altdorf, in the canton of Uri. Tell's defiance and tyrannicide encouraged the population to open rebellion and a pact against the foreign rulers with neighbouring Schwyz and Unterwalden, marking the foundation of the Swiss Confederacy.

- The Legend of Wilhelm Tell: -

William Tell was known as a strong man, a mountain climber, and an expert shot with the crossbow. In his time, the House of Habsburg emperors of Austria were seeking to dominate Uri, and Tell became one of the conspirators of Werner Stauffacher who vowed to resist Habsburg rule. Albrecht Gessler was the newly appointed Austrian Vogt of Altdorf, Switzerland. He raised a pole under the village lindentree, hung his hat on top of it, and demanded that all the townsfolk bow before it.

On 18 November 1307, Tell visited Altdorf with his young son. He passed by the hat, but publicly refused to bow to it, and was consequently arrested. Gessler was intrigued by Tell's famed marksmanship, but resentful of his defiance, so he devised a cruel punishment. Tell and his son were both to be executed; however, he could redeem his life by shooting an apple off the head of his son Walter in a single attempt. Tell split the apple with a bolt from his crossbow. Gessler then noticed that Tell had removed two crossbow bolts from his quiver, so he asked why. Tell was reluctant to answer, but Gessler promised that he would not kill him; he replied that, had he killed his son, he would have killed Gessler with the second bolt. Gessler was furious and ordered Tell to be bound, saying that he had promised to spare his life, but would imprison him for the remainder of his life.

Tell was being carried in Gessler's boat to the dungeon in the castle at Küssnacht when a storm broke on Lake Lucerne, and the guards were afraid that their boat would sink. They begged Gessler to remove Tell's shackles so that he could take the helm and save them. Gessler gave in, but Tell steered the boat to a rocky place and leaped out. The site is known in the "White Book" as the "Tellsplatte" ("Tell's slab"); it has been marked by a memorial chapel since the 16th century. Tell ran cross-country to Küssnacht with Gessler in pursuit. Tell assassinated him using the second crossbow bolt, along a stretch of the road cut through the rock between Immensee and Küssnacht, which is known as the Hohle Gasse. Tell's act sparked a rebellion, which led to the formation of the Old Swiss Confederacy.

                              
   . ~AU'Listings~ .                         .~Au'Medals~.   


Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out