1874 Old Suisse Confederacy St. Gallen Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary of the Burgundian Wars 1474-1476" Mintage. < 1'250 (Book Ref.: Richter 1156a), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.
1874 Old Suisse Confederacy St. Gallen Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary of the Burgundian Wars 1474-1476" Mintage. < 1'250 (Book Ref.: Richter 1156a), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

1874 Old Suisse Confederacy St. Gallen Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary of the Burgundian Wars 1474-1476" Mintage. < 1'250 (Book Ref.: Richter 1156a), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

$260.00
1874 Old Suisse Confederacy St. Gallen Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary of the Burgundian Wars 1474-1476" Mintage. < 1'250 (Book Ref.: Richter 1156a), Beautiful Artistic Design Great Condition Large 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

Country.     The Old Swiss Confederacy.
Canton.      St. Gallen
Venue.        St. Gallen
Years.         1874
Value.         Shooting Thaler - 5-Francs
Composition. Silver
Weight.       25.0 g
Diameter.    37.0 mm
Mintage.     < 1'250

- Schützentaler (Shooting Thaler): -
The Schützentaler is a commemorative coin minted for the Schützenfest or free shooting tournaments held in various cantons within the Swiss Confederation.

Initial Schützentalers were cantonal pieces, minted by the sovereign cantons of Switzerland. All of these pieces, were strictly legal tender and were minted to legal fineness, and were thus allowed to bear the denomination of 5 Frankens.

In 1865, Switzerland became a member of the Latin Monetary Union Schützentalers were not included in the mintages authorized by the Union. Therefore, these issues are commonly considered semi-medallic, though they could circulate due to their size and weight being the same as that of the regular 5 Franken issues. This series began in 1855 with the Solothurn issue and ended in 1885 with the Bern issue. The Monetary Union ceased to exist in 1927.

Most of the Schützentaler designs differ from their then existing circulating counterparts, though the pieces issued for the shooting festivals in 1851 Geneva and 1855 Solothurn are the two only exceptions.
Schützentaler designs depict cantonal or patriotic themes, such as historical military leaders or heraldry. The entire series can be distinguished from shooting medals by their adherence to the specifications of the circulating coinage then.

All talers, except for the 1861 Stans and 1874 St. Gallen issues, carries a denomination value. Although, other countries have minted coins in honour of shooting festivals or marksmanship competitions, but only Swiss pieces are considered uniquely Schützentalers.

The first Schützentaler was issued for the Chur shooting festival in 1842 and is denominated at 4 Frankens. The second, issued for 1847 Glarus, has a face value of 40 Batzen. The third, minted for the shooting festival in 1851 Geneva, is denominated at 10 Frankens.

A total of eighteen designs were struck in the 19th century, concluding with the Bern issue of 1885. All those struck from 1855 to 1885 bear the denomination of five francs. Many nineteenth-century issues were also struck in various other metals besides silver, including gold and white metal, in small quantities.

- "400th Anniversary of the Burgundian Wars, 1474-1476": -
The Burgundian Wars were a conflict between the Burgundian State and the Old Swiss Confederacy and its allies. Open war broke out in 1474, and the Duke of Burgundy, Charles the Bold, was defeated three times on the battlefield in the following years and was killed at the Battle of Nancy in 1477. The Duchy of Burgundy and several other Burgundian lands then became part of France,

Initially in 1469, Duke Sigismund of Habsburg of Austria pawned his possessions in the Alsace in the Treaty of Saint-Omer as a fiefdom to the Duke of Burgundy for a loan or sum of 50,000 florins, as well as an alliance, Charles the Bold, to have them better protected from the expansion of the Eidgenossen (or Old Swiss Confederacy)[citation needed]. Charles's involvement west of the Rhine gave him no reason to attack the confederates, as Sigismund had wanted, but his embargo politics against the cities of Basel, Strasbourg and Mulhouse, directed by his reeve Peter von Hagenbach, prompted these to turn to Bern for help. Charles's expansionist strategy suffered a first setback in his politics when his attack on the Archbishopric of Cologne failed after the unsuccessful Siege of Neuss (1474–75).

In the second phase, Sigismund sought to achieve a peace agreement with the Swiss confederates, which eventually was concluded in Konstanz in 1474 (later called the Ewige Richtung or Perpetual Accord ). He wanted to buy back his Alsace possessions from Charles, who refused. Shortly afterwards, von Hagenbach was captured and executed by decapitation in Alsace, and the Swiss, united with the Alsace cities and Sigismund of Habsburg in an anti-Burgundian league, conquered part of the Burgundian Jura (Franche-Comté) when they won the Battle of Héricourt in November 1474. Louis XI of France joined the coalition by the Treaty of Andernach in December. The next year, Bernese forces conquered and ravaged Vaud, which belonged to the Duchy of Savoy, who was allied with Charles the Bold. In the Valais, the independent republics of the Sieben Zenden, with the help of Bernese and other confederate forces, drove the Savoyards out of the lower Valais after a victory in the Battle on the Planta in November 1475. In 1476, Charles retaliated and marched to Grandson, which belonged to Pierre de Romont of Savoy but had recently been taken by the Swiss, where he had the garrison hanged or drowned in the lake, despite its capitulation. When the Swiss confederate forces arrived a few days later, he was defeated in the Battle of Grandson and was forced to flee the battlefield, leaving behind his artillery and many provisions and valuables.

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