1872 Old Suisse Confederacy Zurich Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Allegory of Zurich Bestows the Winner's Wreath" Mintage. < 1'000 (Book Ref.: Richter 1731b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.
1872 Old Suisse Confederacy Zurich Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Allegory of Zurich Bestows the Winner's Wreath" Mintage. < 1'000 (Book Ref.: Richter 1731b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

1872 Old Suisse Confederacy Zurich Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Allegory of Zurich Bestows the Winner's Wreath" Mintage. < 1'000 (Book Ref.: Richter 1731b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

$280.00
1872 Old Suisse Confederacy Zurich Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Allegory of Zurich Bestows the Winner's Wreath" Mintage. < 1'000 (Book Ref.: Richter 1731b), Beautiful Artistic Design Great Condition Large 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

- "Allegory of Zurich Bestows the Winner's Wreath": -
- Translation of Inscription:-
– "FÜR FREIHEIT UND VATERLAND."
– "For freedom and the fatherland."

Country.      The Old Swiss Confederacy.
Canton.       Zurich
Venue.        Zurich
Years.         1872
Value.         Shooting Thaler - 5-Francs
Composition. Silver
Weight.          25.0 g
Diameter.       37.0 mm
Mintage.        < 1'000

- Schützentaler (Shooting Thaler): -
The Schützentaler is a commemorative coin minted for the Schützenfest or free shooting tournaments held in various cantons within the Swiss Confederation.

Initial Schützentalers were cantonal pieces, minted by the sovereign cantons of Switzerland. All of these pieces, were strictly legal tender and were minted to legal fineness, and were thus allowed to bear the denomination of 5 Frankens.

In 1865, Switzerland became a member of the Latin Monetary Union Schützentalers were not included in the mintages authorized by the Union. Therefore, these issues are commonly considered semi-medallic, though they could circulate due to their size and weight being the same as that of the regular 5 Franken issues. This series began in 1855 with the Solothurn issue and ended in 1885 with the Bern issue. The Monetary Union ceased to exist in 1927.

Most of the Schützentaler designs differ from their then existing circulating counterparts, though the pieces issued for the shooting festivals in 1851 Geneva and 1855 Solothurn are the two only exceptions.
Schützentaler designs depict cantonal or patriotic themes, such as historical military leaders or heraldry. The entire series can be distinguished from shooting medals by their adherence to the specifications of the circulating coinage then.

All talers, except for the 1861 Stans and 1874 St. Gallen issues, carries a denomination value. Although, other countries have minted coins in honour of shooting festivals or marksmanship competitions, but only Swiss pieces are considered uniquely Schützentalers.

The first Schützentaler was issued for the Chur shooting festival in 1842 and is denominated at 4 Frankens. The second, issued for 1847 Glarus, has a face value of 40 Batzen. The third, minted for the shooting festival in 1851 Geneva, is denominated at 10 Frankens.

A total of eighteen designs were struck in the 19th century, concluding with the Bern issue of 1885. All those struck from 1855 to 1885 bear the denomination of five francs. Many nineteenth-century issues were also struck in various other metals besides silver, including gold and white metal, in small quantities.

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out