{Sold} 1779 France John Paul Jones, Commander of the American Fleet, Naval Battle off Scotland Coast Beautiful Large Bronze Medal, Official Re-Struck 1950’s - 1970’s. 55.0 mm
{Sold} 1779 France John Paul Jones, Commander of the American Fleet, Naval Battle off Scotland Coast Beautiful Large Bronze Medal, Official Re-Struck 1950’s - 1970’s. 55.0 mm

{Sold} 1779 France John Paul Jones, Commander of the American Fleet, Naval Battle off Scotland Coast Beautiful Large Bronze Medal, Official Re-Struck 1950’s - 1970’s. 55.0 mm

$90.00

The offer here is for an intricately designed attractive old 1779 France John Paul Jones, Commander of the American Fleet, Naval Battle off Scotland Coast Beautiful Large Bronze Medal, Later Official Re-Struck 1950’s - 1970’s. 55.0 mm 80.6 Grs.

The medal is sharply struck with incredible quantity of details. The front design is exceptional, immortalizing the noteworthy naval sea battle involving - John Paul Jones skippered the USS Bonhomme Richard, victorious vs. the more guns HMS Serapis off the Scottish coast.

Country. French Republic
Subject. Great Naval Sea Battle Off the Coast of Scotland - John Paul Jones
Date.      23rd September 1779
Inscriptions. (Translated from Latin)
“The Ships of the Enemy, Having Put to Flight or Being Taken...”

Composition. Bronze
Size.               55.0 mm
Weight.          80.6 Grs.
Engraved.      Dupre F.

Older re-struck circa. 1950’s - 1970’s.

- Battle of Flamborough Head: -
In 1779, Captain Jones took command of the 42-gun USS Bonhomme Richard, merchant ship rebuilt and given to America by the French shipping magnate, Jacques-Donatien Le Ray. On August 14, as a vast French and Spanish invasion fleet approached England, he provided a diversion by heading for Ireland at the head of a five ship squadron including the 36-gun USS Alliance, 32-gun USS Pallas, 12-gun USS Vengeance, and Le Cerf, also accompanied by two privateers, Monsieur and Granville. When the squadron was only a few days out of Groix, Monsieur separated due to a disagreement between her captain and Jones. Several Royal Navy warships were sent towards Ireland in pursuit of Jones, but on this occasion, he continued right around the north of Scotland into the North Sea. Jones's main problems, as on his previous voyage, resulted from insubordination, particularly by Pierre Landais, captain of Alliance. On September 23, 1779, the squadron met a large merchant convoy off the coast of Flamborough Head, East Yorkshire. The 50-gun British frigate HMS Serapis and the 22-gun hired armed ship Countess of Scarborough placed themselves between the convoy and Jones's squadron, allowing the merchants to escape.

Shortly after 7 p.m. the Battle of Flamborough Head began. Serapis engaged Bonhomme Richard, and soon afterwards, Alliance fired, from a considerable distance, at Countess. Quickly recognizing that he could not win a battle of big guns, and with the wind dying, Jones made every effort to lock Richard and Serapis together (his famous, albeit possibly apocryphal, quotation "I have not yet begun to fight!" was uttered in reply to a demand to surrender in this phase of the battle), finally succeeding after about an hour, following which his deck guns and his Marine marksmen in the rigging began clearing the British decks. Alliance sailed past and fired a broadside, doing at least as much damage to Richard as to Serapis. Meanwhile, Countess of Scarborough had enticed Pallas downwind of the main battle, beginning a separate engagement. When Alliance approached this contest, about an hour after it had begun, the badly damaged Countess surrendered.

With Bonhomme Richard burning and sinking, it seems that her ensign was shot away; when one of the officers, apparently believing his captain to be dead, shouted a surrender, the British commander asked, seriously this time, if they had struck their colours. Jones later remembered saying something like "I am determined to make you strike", but the words allegedly heard by crew-members and reported in newspapers a few days later were more like: "I may sink, but I'll be damned if I strike". An attempt by the British to board Bonhomme Richard was thwarted, and a grenade caused the explosion of a large quantity of gunpowder on Serapis's lower gun-deck. Alliance returned to the main battle, firing two broadsides. Again, these did at least as much damage to Richard as to Serapis, but the tactic worked to the extent that, unable to move, and with Alliance keeping well out of the line of his own great guns, Captain Pearson of Serapis accepted that prolonging the battle could achieve nothing, so he surrendered. Most of Bonhomme Richard's crew immediately transferred to other vessels, and after a day and a half of frantic repair efforts, it was decided that the ship could not be saved, so it was allowed to sink, and Jones took command of Serapis for the trip to the island of Texel in neutral (but American-sympathizing) Holland.

In the following year, the King of France Louis XVI, honored him with the title "Chevalier". Jones accepted the honor, and desired the title to be used thereafter: when the Continental Congress in 1787 resolved that a medal of gold be struck in commemoration of his "valor and brilliant services" it was to be presented to "Chevalier John Paul Jones". He also received from Louis XVI a decoration of "l'Institution du Mérite Militaire" and a sword. By contrast, in Britain at this time, he was usually denigrated as a pirate.

                              
   . ~AU'Listings~ .                         .~Au'Medals~.   

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