{Sold} 1881 Old Suisse Confederacy Fribourg Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary Fribourg & Solothurn Joins Confederacy" Mintage. < 2'500 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.
{Sold} 1881 Old Suisse Confederacy Fribourg Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary Fribourg & Solothurn Joins Confederacy" Mintage. < 2'500 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

{Sold} 1881 Old Suisse Confederacy Fribourg Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary Fribourg & Solothurn Joins Confederacy" Mintage. < 2'500 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

$150.00
1881 Old Suisse Confederacy Fribourg Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "400th Anniversary Fribourg & Solothurn Joins Confederacy" Mintage. < 2'500 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), Beautiful Artistic Design Great Condition Large 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

Country.     The Old Swiss Confederacy.
Canton.      Fribourg
Venue.        Freibourg
Years.         1881
Value.         Shooting Thaler - 5-Francs
Composition. Silver
Weight.          25.0 g
Diameter.      37.0 mm
Mintage.       < 2'500

- Schützentaler (Shooting Thaler): -
The Schützentaler is a commemorative coin minted for the Schützenfest or free shooting tournaments held in various cantons within the Swiss Confederation.

Initial Schützentalers were cantonal pieces, minted by the sovereign cantons of Switzerland. All of these pieces, were strictly legal tender and were minted to legal fineness, and were thus allowed to bear the denomination of 5 Frankens.

In 1865, Switzerland became a member of the Latin Monetary Union Schützentalers were not included in the mintages authorized by the Union. Therefore, these issues are commonly considered semi-medallic, though they could circulate due to their size and weight being the same as that of the regular 5 Franken issues. This series began in 1855 with the Solothurn issue and ended in 1885 with the Bern issue. The Monetary Union ceased to exist in 1927.

Most of the Schützentaler designs differ from their then existing circulating counterparts, though the pieces issued for the shooting festivals in 1851 Geneva and 1855 Solothurn are the two only exceptions.
Schützentaler designs depict cantonal or patriotic themes, such as historical military leaders or heraldry. The entire series can be distinguished from shooting medals by their adherence to the specifications of the circulating coinage then.

All talers, except for the 1861 Stans and 1874 St. Gallen issues, carries a denomination value. Although, other countries have minted coins in honour of shooting festivals or marksmanship competitions, but only Swiss pieces are considered uniquely Schützentalers.

The first Schützentaler was issued for the Chur shooting festival in 1842 and is denominated at 4 Frankens. The second, issued for 1847 Glarus, has a face value of 40 Batzen. The third, minted for the shooting festival in 1851 Geneva, is denominated at 10 Frankens.

A total of eighteen designs were struck in the 19th century, concluding with the Bern issue of 1885. All those struck from 1855 to 1885 bear the denomination of five francs. Many nineteenth-century issues were also struck in various other metals besides silver, including gold and white metal, in small quantities.

- "400th Anniversary Fribourg & Solothurn Joins Confederacy - 1481": -

– Fribourg Joining the Swiss Confederation
Its name is derived from German frei (free) and Burg (fort).

Beginning at the time of its inception, Fribourg (founded 1157 by the Berthold IV, Duke of Zähringen) built a city-state, where lands it controlled lay some distance away. When the dukes of Zähringen died out in 1218, the city was transferred to the related Kyburg family.

The city was then sold to the Habsburgs in 1277. Trade and industry began as early as the mid-13th century. In the early period, the city developed rapidly, which led to expansions reflecting the economic boom in Fribourg. The 14th century was dominated by trade, and cloth and leather production, which brought the city recognition in Central Europe by 1370.

In 1339, Fribourg participated alongside the Habsburgs and the County of Burgundy in the Battle of Laupen against Bern and its Swiss Confederacy allies. The treaty with Bern was renewed in 1403. The leaders of the city then began a territorial acquisition, in which they gradually brought more nearby land under their control.

The mid-15th century was shaped by various military conflicts. First, considerable losses in a war against Savoy had to be made good. The Savoyard influence on the city grew, and the Habsburgs ceded it to them in 1452. It remained under the control of Savoy until the Burgundian Wars in 1477. As an ally of Bern, Fribourg participated in the war against Charles I of Burgundy, thereby bringing more land under its control. After the city was released from the sphere of influence of Savoy, it attained the status of Free Imperial City in 1478.

The city and its canton joined the Swiss Confederation in 1481.

– Solothurn Joining the Swiss Confederation
Its name is derived from Salodurum, a Roman-era settlement.

During the Early Middle Ages, Solothurn was part of the Kingdom of Lotharingia (Lorraine). After the collapse of Lotharingia, it became part of the Second Kingdom of Burgundy. In 1033, the Kingdom of Burgundy became part of the Holy Roman Empire and Solothurn gained some independence. In 1127, the dukes of Zähringen then acquired it.

After the extinction of the Zähringer line in 1218, it became a free imperial city under the Holy Roman Emperor. In 1344, Solothurn acquired the right to appoint own Schultheiss from the Count of Buchegg, which was confirmed by Emperor Charles IV in 1360.

As the city grew in power, it bound the Monastery of St. Ursus more closely to the city. In 1251 the city defeated claims made by the Monastery on the right to appoint the Schultheiss.

In 1382 the Habsburgs attacked the city, involving Solothurn in the Battle of Sempach. By the treaty of two years later, the Habsburgs renounced all claims to the territory of the city. The latter was expanded by acquisition of neighboring lands in the 15th century, roughly up to the today's canton area.

In 1481, it obtained full membership in the Swiss Confederation.

In memory of the 400th year anniversary of the joining of the cantons of Fribourg and Solothurn, into the Old Swiss Confederation in 1481.


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