{Sold} 1869 Old Suisse Confederacy Zug Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Hans Landwing Saves the Banner at Battle of Arbedo - 1422" Mintage. < 750 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.
{Sold} 1869 Old Suisse Confederacy Zug Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Hans Landwing Saves the Banner at Battle of Arbedo - 1422" Mintage. < 750 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

{Sold} 1869 Old Suisse Confederacy Zug Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Hans Landwing Saves the Banner at Battle of Arbedo - 1422" Mintage. < 750 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

$450.00
1869 Old Suisse Confederacy Zug Schutzenfest Shooting Thaler 5-Francs Silver Coin, "Hans Landwing Saves the Banner at Battle of Arbedo - 1422" Mintage. < 750 (Book Ref.: Richter 1671b), Beautiful Artistic Design Great Condition Large 37 mm. Ex.Rare.

Country.     The Old Swiss Confederacy.
Canton.      Zug
Venue.       Zug
Years.        1869
Value.        Shooting Thaler - 5-Francs
Composition. Silver
Weight.          25.0 g
Diameter.      37.0 mm
Mintage.        < 750

- Schützentaler (Shooting Thaler): -
The Schützentaler is a commemorative coin minted for the Schützenfest or free shooting tournaments held in various cantons within the Swiss Confederation.

Initial Schützentalers were cantonal pieces, minted by the sovereign cantons of Switzerland. All of these pieces, were strictly legal tender and were minted to legal fineness, and were thus allowed to bear the denomination of 5 Frankens.

In 1865, Switzerland became a member of the Latin Monetary Union Schützentalers were not included in the mintages authorized by the Union. Therefore, these issues are commonly considered semi-medallic, though they could circulate due to their size and weight being the same as that of the regular 5 Franken issues. This series began in 1855 with the Solothurn issue and ended in 1885 with the Bern issue. The Monetary Union ceased to exist in 1927.

Most of the Schützentaler designs differ from their then existing circulating counterparts, though the pieces issued for the shooting festivals in 1851 Geneva and 1855 Solothurn are the two only exceptions.
Schützentaler designs depict cantonal or patriotic themes, such as historical military leaders or heraldry. The entire series can be distinguished from shooting medals by their adherence to the specifications of the circulating coinage then.

All talers, except for the 1861 Stans and 1874 St. Gallen issues, carries a denomination value. Although, other countries have minted coins in honour of shooting festivals or marksmanship competitions, but only Swiss pieces are considered uniquely Schützentalers.

The first Schützentaler was issued for the Chur shooting festival in 1842 and is denominated at 4 Frankens. The second, issued for 1847 Glarus, has a face value of 40 Batzen. The third, minted for the shooting festival in 1851 Geneva, is denominated at 10 Frankens.

A total of eighteen designs were struck in the 19th century, concluding with the Bern issue of 1885. All those struck from 1855 to 1885 bear the denomination of five francs. Many nineteenth-century issues were also struck in various other metals besides silver, including gold and white metal, in small quantities.

- "Hans Landwing Saves the Banner at Battle of Arbedo - 1422": -
The Battle of Arbedo was fought on June 30, 1422, between the Duchy of Milan and the Swiss Confederation.

In 1419, Uri and Unterwalden bought the Bellinzona stronghold from the Sacco barons, but were unable to defend it adequately. When, in 1422, they rejected the Milanese proposal to buy back the fortified town, their troops stationed in Bellinzona were put to rout by the Visconti army under the command of Francesco Bussone, Count of Carmagnola. An attempt to reconquer the fortified area with the support of other confederates led to the battle at Arbedo, a village 3 km (1.9 mi) north of Bellinzona. The Count of Carmagnola led the forces of the Duchy of Milan against the Swiss and was victorious.

The shooting thaler of the 1869 federal Schützenfest depicts Hans Landwing saving the cantonal banner.

The Swiss were mainly equipped with halberds and had an initial success against the cavalry charge. Then Carmagnola brought his crossbowmen forward, while dismounting his cavalry. The dismounted men-at-arms used pikes which outreached the halberds. The Swiss were further under pressure by the crossbow fire on the flanks.

The Milanese force began to push back the Swiss, who were only saved from total disaster by the appearance of a band of foragers, whom the Milanese were convinced represented a major new force. When the Milanese force pulled back to reform, the Swiss fled the battlefield, having taken heavy casualties.

In a historiographical tradition of Zug, the bearer of the cantonal banner, Peter Kälin, was slain, and the banner was taken up by his son, who was slain in his turn. The banner was saved by one Hans Landwing, and was later lost against the French.

The victory secured Bellinzona and the Leventina to the Duchy. In addition the Duchy gained the Val d'Ossola, thus the Swiss lost all the territorial gains they had made. The defeat discouraged the Swiss expansionist intentions towards Lake Maggiore for a long time. It was the defeat at Arbedo that made the Swiss increase the number of pikemen.


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